The North End as a distinct community of Boston was evident as early as 1646.[1] Three years later, the area had a large enough population to support its own church, called the North Meeting House. The construction of the building also led to the development of the area now known as North Square, which was the center of community life.[1][2]

Increase Mather, the minister of the North Meeting House, was an influential and powerful figure who attracted residents to the North End.[1] His home, the meeting house, and surrounding buildings were destroyed by a fire in 1676. The meeting house was rebuilt soon afterwards. The Paul Revere House was later constructed on the site of the Mather House.[1] Part of Copp's Hill was converted to a cemetery, called the North Burying Ground (now known as Copp's Hill Burying Ground). The earliest grave markers located in the cemetery date back to 1661.[2]

The North End as a distinct community of Boston was evident as early as 1646.[1] Three years later, the area had a large enough population to support its own church, called the North Meeting House. The construction of the building also led to the development of the area now known as North Square, which was the center of community life.[1][2]



The North End as a distinct community of Boston was evident as early as 1646.[1] Three years later, the area had a large enough population to support its own church, called the North Meeting House. The construction of the building also led to the development of the area now known as North Square, which was the center of community life.[1][2]